Matt and Friends Drink the Universe

Lights, Camera, Spirits! Part 1 - "Interview with Harrison Smith"

October 20, 2023 Matt and Friends Drink The Universe Season 2 Episode 16
Lights, Camera, Spirits! Part 1 - "Interview with Harrison Smith"
Matt and Friends Drink the Universe
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Matt and Friends Drink the Universe
Lights, Camera, Spirits! Part 1 - "Interview with Harrison Smith"
Oct 20, 2023 Season 2 Episode 16
Matt and Friends Drink The Universe

Text us what you think about the podcast!

For our Halloween special Matt and Rob interview writer, producer, director, best-selling author, and host of the Cynema podcast Harrison Smith! This episode promises an insightful conversation with Harrison as he gives a peak into his upcoming projects and shares the origins of his passion for horror films.

As we delve deeper into the convolutions of the entertainment industry, we explore the potential seismic shift AI could inflict on Hollywood. Harrison, armed with his wealth of knowledge, offers enlightening perspectives on the rapidly emerging technology; from its application in de-aging actors and generating film characters, to the challenges it presents to those in the industry.

Matt and Rob also present Harrison with a new cocktail they have specially crafted to pair with his movie, "The Special," which Matt and friends will watch and react to next week!

Support the Show.

Please visit www.mattandfriendsdtu.com for links to all of the places you can listen, our merch store, and more!

Check out our sponsor,
Poppin's Travel Company, for all of your travel needs! Their highly qualified agents are ready to book your next big adventure or dream vacation!

We'd love to hear from you on social media! Like and follow us on
Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Threads and X.

Cheers, and thanks for listening!

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Text us what you think about the podcast!

For our Halloween special Matt and Rob interview writer, producer, director, best-selling author, and host of the Cynema podcast Harrison Smith! This episode promises an insightful conversation with Harrison as he gives a peak into his upcoming projects and shares the origins of his passion for horror films.

As we delve deeper into the convolutions of the entertainment industry, we explore the potential seismic shift AI could inflict on Hollywood. Harrison, armed with his wealth of knowledge, offers enlightening perspectives on the rapidly emerging technology; from its application in de-aging actors and generating film characters, to the challenges it presents to those in the industry.

Matt and Rob also present Harrison with a new cocktail they have specially crafted to pair with his movie, "The Special," which Matt and friends will watch and react to next week!

Support the Show.

Please visit www.mattandfriendsdtu.com for links to all of the places you can listen, our merch store, and more!

Check out our sponsor,
Poppin's Travel Company, for all of your travel needs! Their highly qualified agents are ready to book your next big adventure or dream vacation!

We'd love to hear from you on social media! Like and follow us on
Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Threads and X.

Cheers, and thanks for listening!

Matt:

10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. We have liftoff.

Rob:

Welcome to Matt and Friends Drink the Universe!

Matt:

Alright, welcome back everyone to Matt and Friends Drink the Universe. I'm very excited about today's episode. Today's episode theme is going to be Lights Camera

Matt:

So it's going to be lights, camera spirits. Our Halloween special. Joining me here today, outside of our normal recording space, is Hi guys, it's Rob Alright, and also with us today. I'm very excited to introduce writer, producer, director, best-selling author, host of the Cinema Podcast and, if I interpreted our family tree correctly, my second cousin. Welcome, harrison Smith. Thank you so much for being with us on the podcast today.

Matt:

It's nice to be here. Thanks for having me. So we're going to ask you some questions now. Bring them on. The people need to know things, that's true. So what are you working on right now? What do you got going on?

Harrison Smith:

Well, the writer's strike is over, the actor's strike is still going on, so I'm on hold on three different projects. I'm supposed to be heading to California anytime now to do a horror film, a slasher film, in Big Bear I'm pretty excited about that with the cast and everything. And then moving on to a supernatural horror called Keepsake, and then also doing one that I just optioned the rights to a serial killer true life story called break, which is based on the true story of a bone breaker in Michigan and his this. He used to capture these kids and he got off on the sound of breaking bones. Oh my God.

Harrison Smith:

And this kid got away and so I ended up optioning the survivor's story and we're going to turn that into a film. Wow, and we're really excited. We want to get offers out to a couple you know, big name stars. I have one in mind who's one of my favorite actors.

Rob:

I can't say who it is yet because he's not under contract. Okay, all right. No, I'm baseball today because, well, right, the only reason why is it's all bullshit until they sign the contract.

Harrison Smith:

So there are no contracts to sign until the strike is over, so I'm hoping I get him. He's a fan of my work. Anyway, he's read a previous script that I have one going on a developing in Canada called little green men, which is based on the true story, or alleged true story, of an alien attack on a Kentucky farm in 1954, which is where the name little green men came from, where the term came from. The sheriff who investigated wrote down on the police report. You know farm came under attack from little green men.

Harrison Smith:

So that's how that phrase are lexicon.

Rob:

That's really cool. So, harrison, I'm going to start off and just ask why, whore, what, what draws you to that medium? What? What drew you to that? Based upon that, versus other types of cinema?

Harrison Smith:

Well, I love all kinds, but since a boy, my grandmother and I used to watch horror films all the time. I spent an incredible amount of time. My grandmother, my mother and my biological father had a pretty rough relationship. It was an ugly divorce. So I spent a lot of time with my grandmother, who was my father's mother, and if you watch the movie the fields with chlorosleechman and Tara Reid, that's the true story, based on my childhood and the events that happened on their farm in the summer of 73, which explains the horror stuff. I would just watch horror movies either late night with her or I'd watch them, you know, saturday afternoon creature features. By the time I was eight years old, I mean I knew Peter Cushing, vincent Price, peter Laurie you name them Boris, karla, bill Lugosi I knew them all, so I had my grandmother to thank for that.

Harrison Smith:

I wrote a book about it called this Time it's Personal which is a history of the horror genre and what I grew up loving, and then seeing a lot of these films also in theaters, and the fantastic theatrical experiences these films gave, which we just don't have anymore now. The pandemic helped bring that to an end. You know, to be in a seat, you know in a house with 350 seats and people screaming their asses off, that's a rush, that's a lot of fun and we just don't have that anymore. We just really don't.

Harrison Smith:

And so watching horror films with groups like I'm excited to hear that you're having like a group watch of the special, somebody on TikTok did one with like 25 people and they were all like oh, this is fucked up, and I was like they posted that I'm just enjoying, like I had to chime in on the comments and go, just so you know that's my movie. And the one girl was like get the hell out. And then she started following me. But they just loved it because it achieved what I wanted. We got to show it theatrically in York for its premiere and I was sitting in the back and nobody knew I was sitting in the back and this woman came storming with her husband in tow and she walked right by. She had no idea who I was and she was just like I've had enough of this shit and she walked out and it was like that's a rape right there. That's shocking, all Yep Fantastic.

Harrison Smith:

If you're walking out that is a good thing, and if you pissed them off, it's a really good thing. So there we go. So that's that's my answer. I loved it since.

Matt:

I was a child. Awesome, very cool Since, since you mentioned her, I wanted to ask. I listened today to the episode. I was trying to get caught up in your podcast a little bit and I listened to the Tara Reid episode and I thought it was absolutely fantastic when I listened to a lot of information that you know I wasn't aware of. She uttered one of my favorite lines in cinema ever, which is I'm Gwen Pearson, staff writer for the liberator liberator in Van Wilder, which I remember that movie when it, when it came out, thoroughly enjoyed it. So when I heard you work with her, I thought that was really, really cool.

Harrison Smith:

Yeah, tara and I are still close friends. We've stayed very close.

Matt:

Oh, very cool. That's awesome, very cool. I enjoyed the story about the the dog as well.

Harrison Smith:

Oh, she was great with that. She just she never missed a beat. She was terrific.

Matt:

So I'm alluding to a story that Harrison tells on his podcast, and I'd like you to go listen to that particular episode, because it is fantastic and it's a wonderful story and we'll teach you things you didn't know about, something you probably thought you knew something about, but you really don't.

Harrison Smith:

Yeah, that's why I did it. You know, people have just been absolutely horrible to Tara and or, as I said the one time, terrible to her. So it's like, yeah, I've always stuck by her and I loved working with her. I would work with her again in a heartbeat and I so enjoyed her. So, and, like I said, we stay close. We're the, you know, wishing each other happy birthdays and Christmas and all that stuff, and she's just terrific.

Rob:

She plays my mother Very cool. So before we get to our next set of questions, I think we should tell Harrison a little bit about the cocktail we made for today, and we're going to make this for our friends in the watch along as well. We call it the special because we'll be watching the special later. And, matt, do you want to explain what you did here?

Matt:

Sure, so inside this thing floating around and kind of chunky and viscous at the top, there is some grape jello and it's select grain vodka from Christmas City Spirits here in Bethlehem, pa. So it's more or less a grape jello shot. With that vodka has a very vanilla flavor to it. That tip it's actually a sipping vodka, so it actually you can sit and drink it and not feel like you're going to die, which is very rare for a vodka and it is actually just floating over sprite.

Rob:

Yeah, we wanted to get that kind of texture and look of the poster of the special where you can see some of the blob stuff coming out of the box. It is quite tasty it was surprisingly tasty.

Matt:

If you listen to this podcast ever for anyone, you will find out rapidly that there are many things we try that aren't all that great at all.

Rob:

You'll also find out that most of those things come from him. That's this this poor guy's been hosting this podcast for so long and he hasn't. He hasn't won any of our games yet.

Matt:

That's very true. I get to win, like one of our trivia episodes or any of the other. You know history based, like booze battles or anything else that we do, sure. So I've mentioned to you before that I am an IT guy in real life and I am fascinated with AI and how it's developing, and I'm a company that I work for is looking for, like how Microsoft's going to incorporate it and things like that, and I understand that you wrote a 20 page letter to the LA Times that was never published and actually before the writer strike started on the potential impact of AI and what it would mean for writers in Hollywood. Would you talk about that a little bit please?

Harrison Smith:

Sure, yeah, and in fact after this I'll email you something that I'm working on with AI right now. But in the meantime, yeah, I wrote a 20 page letter to the unions, to both SAG and the WGA, and I sent it to the LA Times, I sent it to New York Times, rolling Stone, hollywood Reporter. Now they're all corporate owned. That's one. The other thing is I wrote about that this strike is really human's last stand, when, at least when it comes to entertainment, I've been saying for the last 20, 30 years that if I were a major movie star, I'd be copywriting or trademarking my image to prevent anybody from, you know, just doing it, taking it away. Because we are now within shooting range of, I'm going to say, five years where you can see Tom Hanks star with Marilyn Monroe. You can put James Bond, you can watch any James Bond you want and swap them into different movies. So if you want Roger Moore and Casino Royale, you can do that.

Rob:

This is all coming.

Harrison Smith:

It's all a little stilted yet, especially in the animation part, but if you saw the new Indiana Jones film this summer, then you will know what I'm talking about, because when they pull that bag off his head in the movie, harrison Ford is 42 years old again and if you didn't know it was AI, you'd never know. It looks fantastic. I don't care what any critic says. They look eff you. It looked great. So someone's winning an Oscar for that.

Rob:

Yeah, there's been quite a few de-aging lately that have really blown my mind. The one that comes to mind the most is Samuel L Jackson in the Captain Marvel movie. I mean, it looked like he was the same age as he was when he did Pulp Fiction, absolutely, and I was like this is crazy.

Harrison Smith:

So now we're going to just generate. What we'll do is we'll just generate characters. I've had my crew go to work on several. My crew went on to work on Shazam too, and Philly, and one of them told me that they asked for like 3000 extras and when the 3000 extras showed up, they only chose like 300. And when she asked, why did you do that, they said, well, we'll fill in the stadium with CGI people. And then the extras that were chosen had to go to a special trailer where they were all photographed and T poses and all that so their images can be replicated in the future.

Harrison Smith:

So this is here. It's not changing. I mean I'm not telling the IT guy anything that he doesn't know. This is not technology. That is not changing.

Harrison Smith:

Like, oh, you wait, in a couple of years we're talking a couple of months. Like I have to stay on top of all of this. I'm very, I'm getting very proficient in stable diffusion. I'm understanding all of this with Control Net. I'm understanding, you know, auto pose, all these things that are that are going on, and I'm doing it because I have to and it won't be anything before you know, scripts are being written. I always have people going.

Harrison Smith:

No, people always want human written scripts. Really, did you fucking see the flash? Really that needed a human being to write that? It was nothing but one long CGI bullshit thing and really we needed a human to write that. We're coming to the point where somebody's just going to say give me, die hard with jaws, and I want a little terminator action.

Harrison Smith:

And it's just that's why these studio heads, especially Bob Iger of Disney, were so obnoxious in the beginning of this strike, because Bob Iger was not just speaking for himself, but he was speaking what I always call the head of the five families in the studios was go ahead and strike and when you lose your homes, you'll come back to us. That means, if you read between the lines, we're getting something better to replace you. That's what it really means. And eventually what's going to happen is hey, you don't need to pay writers anymore and you don't have to send out residuals and you don't have to do any of that stuff because the algorithm is going to take care of it all. So it's happening. It's changing on a weekly, if not monthly, advance. This stuff like I have to. I watch tutorials every week because if I don't, things change, like in two, three weeks, it's all different again.

Matt:

Yeah.

Harrison Smith:

And that's what I wrote about in this 20 page letter that Back in the 80s and I don't want to dwell on this, but back in the 80s the studio should have sat down before everybody started dumping all their shit on the video and they should have said we're going to hold back certain films like the Library of Congress that are culturally relevant and we're going to keep these films off of video, then re-release them in theaters, you know, every so many years, whatever. And they didn't do that and they just dumped their product out on video, on substandard releases, with bad transfers and grainy, poor contrast letter, not even letterbox, all pan and scan and it was terrible. But they did it for the quick catch and they never thought about the implications of this coming up. A lot of actors did look the look. The laws could not catch up with the technology and we're in the same situation now.

Harrison Smith:

All the time. So you know before you think, oh, that's never going to happen. You saw Rogue One. Right, peter Cushing was not just in the movie for 30 seconds in some bullshit cameo, the guy's in a third of the movie. He's been dead since 1994.

Matt:

That's pretty good for a dead guy.

Harrison Smith:

Look pretty damn good for a dead guy and sounded pretty damn good.

Matt:

And I know they said well they had a real actor.

Harrison Smith:

It doesn't matter. It is getting to the point where we won't need real actors to put on the mask. And you know, with the dots and the tracking it's coming and this is changing. You can now make AI video and insert camera angles. So all you cinematographers out there, you better understand that you're in college. If you're starting out as a freshman this coming fall, you might not have a position by the time you graduate. You may be obsolete in four years. This is where it's going.

Rob:

Have a good friend that's starting to learn Unreal Engine to try to understand you know how to build digital environments and do it. You know and do it and use different. You know techniques to get the camera to make the same motion in real life that it does inside your virtual environment.

Harrison Smith:

Absolutely, and it's all here. And for those that are going, you'll never replace real people. These are the same kind of people that 100 years ago said why would anybody want to do that? Why would anybody want to hear a movie? Why would anybody want talking motion pictures? Why would anybody want color? It's the same thing. We are at a precipice where we're going to go over the edge here. So, these actors, you can strike for your residuals, you can do all you want and you're going to get a few scraps thrown at you from the table. But there was no bill of rights drawn up and SAG has not done it yet, with the studio saying AI can't be used for the following things. They didn't do it and the studios did not get together. Because they don't want to get together? Because, in the end, they want to develop this technology. They want this technology to finally make them independent, and my prediction is, within the next 10 to 12 years, film studios will just become technology studios. That's what they will become and product and people go.

Harrison Smith:

Well, you know, people want original stories. Don't give me that bullshit. They're ready to reboot Star Trek again. No, they don't want original stories. Really, we got Halloween kills. We got Halloween ends. We got the remake, or reboot, or reimagining, semi-sequel to Halloween 2018. Now we have another exorcist movie. This is what we've got. This is originality. This is creativity. Get out of here. We're making the same garbage. That's what they're going to do, and they're going to recycle the same goddamn movie plots over and over and over. You've got George Lucas now saying I want to buy back Star Wars because Disney fucked it all up, which they did, okay, and anybody who tells you they didn't is wrong, because they took it and they ran it into the ground, because they had to get that 4 billion back.

Matt:

That's what it?

Harrison Smith:

was. They ruined Indiana Jones, they ruined Star Wars, they ruined it all, and they did it. And they've run Marvel into the ground the same goddamn way, and they're doing it all the time, because this isn't about creativity, this is about content and numbers.

Matt:

That's what this is about, I wanted to hop in. I don't know if you've seen any of the Disney series like the Ahsoka series that's going on right now. That, to me, was some of the most Star Wars content that's been put out. It very much had that original vibe. You didn't know what was coming. It wasn't the formula.

Rob:

It wasn't the standard formula. That's because Dave Filoni is George Lucas's reincarnation, even though George Lucas is still here. Well, if you guys on Twitter.

Harrison Smith:

You go look up a guy. He has an account. He's called Ruin Johnson instead of Ryan Johnson. Look him up. This guy's account is like dead on and in fact, ryan Johnson. He pinned the tweet. Ryan Johnson tweeted this account and said I have come to deeply respect the devotion of the owner of this account because he calls himself Bruins Johnson and you just got to see the account, you'll understand. You'll totally get it.

Matt:

So why we got you going a little bit here. I want to talk about Rob for a second.

Rob:

Oh, why are we talking about?

Matt:

Oh, we're going to talk about you for a second. But he's so much more interesting because I want his take on a movie that you were in, where we in rock Is it porn?

Harrison Smith:

God no.

Matt:

One of those movies I couldn't get cast.

Rob:

Wow, you really want to go there, buddy, you really want to go there.

Harrison Smith:

I dated a porn star, so what are you talking?

Rob:

about? Are you talking about the films that I made with my friends or the actual film that I was in?

Matt:

No, I'm talking about the film that people will genuinely know when you say what it is Okay.

Rob:

I did background work for the Ghostbusters reboot.

Harrison Smith:

My condolences. Wait, which one? The Melissa McCarthy one.

Rob:

Oh yes, oh yes, I went up to. So, listen, I've been a lifelong fan of Ghostbusters and Same here.

Harrison Smith:

I've enjoyed it.

Rob:

A good friend of mine was working on set. I don't know if I can say what he was doing. I mean I guess the project's over, so at whatever, I won't say. He was working as an assistant for somebody on set and he called me up and he said hey, send me a picture of your face and all of your measurements. Said I'm not gonna guarantee anything, but somebody will call you. He said I'll guarantee that somebody will give you a call. So they they gave me a call, casting gave me a call and they said hey, you know, we want you to come up and do some background work. You know, could you? Could you come for two weeks? And I just started a brand new job and I was like no, I just can't, they won't let me take off in two weeks, because they originally wanted me to do the the outro, like dance scene where all the SWAT team and an army gets possessed.

Rob:

It's like three dance scenes in that movie, so they wanted me to come for the first week to learn the choreography and then shoot it for the second week, which would have been in New York. I think they actually sat shot that in New York, but the rest they were shooting New York, in Boston in a giant warehouse. Then they said oh well, you know, can you come for one week?

Matt:

Can you come to New York in Boston? Yeah?

Rob:

and then I. Then I couldn't do that. So eventually we set it on I could come for a day. So I came for a day and I wound up I'm in the movie twice as two different background characters and two different costumes. So it was fun, it was a cool experience. It's certainly Crazy to see the scale of like a real set. You know, because we were in just a giant warehouse and they built buildings, it's like they. I was in a two-story hotel inside of a warehouse and I was like this is wild, but but yeah, it was, it was a lot of fun.

Rob:

So I actually I don't know if I can Get in trouble for saying this now but I had no idea, like what was kosher and like what, what you're allowed to do on set. So I'm waiting in the back lot, like waiting for to get called it to go shoot and found this little tent that had delicious like Margaritas and snacks and pizza, and I was eating and somebody comes up and they're like man, I feel so bad for like all of like the regular People here who aren't allowed to have this food, and I was like, yeah, me too. And then come to find out it was like a sag Tent and I'm not sad. So I just acted like I belong in the night, tilted out of there, yep. So yeah, that's that's my, my brief cinema experience.

Matt:

So if you're ever looking for like two bloated corpses to lay in the background in one of your movies, your guys are right here.

Rob:

Yeah, harrison, I wanted to ask. So you know, obviously you, you're a jack of all trades, you know you write your produce, you direct. Do you prefer Directing something that you've written or directing something that somebody else has written?

Harrison Smith:

I mean you always prefer what you've written because it's kind of production shorthand. You know what you have in your head and you know what you want to do. The special I did some polishing on the script, but that was someone else's script, that was two gentlemen, mark Steensland and James Newman, and but I enjoyed directing it. I mean, if the script is great, it doesn't matter. If the script is good, it doesn't matter.

Rob:

If you had enjoyed this if you had to pick one thing to do for the rest of your career, Would it be directing or writing? Not be right? Writing right?

Matt:

okay. So the one question I did want to ask is, as we said earlier, we are gonna group watch the special here in a little bit. I have watched it before. The three that are joining me have not. Is there anything you want them to know before we start watching? I know what to expect here?

Harrison Smith:

Yeah, you know what to expect. I mean the cool thing I used to tell audiences when we Debuted out in San Francisco at a horror sci-fi festival that we got accepted into. They wanted it, and I Told the audience, you know, see, it was someone you hate. You know that's the best way to put it. It's kind of like a midnight horror chick flick Kind of thing. For any anybody that's ever been cheated on, it's a great film You'll want to give your lover the special you know, and that's that's what I enjoy about it. So much that you know I, yeah, you really got to indulge yourself a little bit in the the creature feature, kind of weird.

Harrison Smith:

I just enjoy those kind of films so much so my my DP, matt Matnease, really did a wonderful job, like the lighting of Madame Zora's. You know, whorehouse is just so cool. Like I wanted this Pastel kind of look and he gave it. And so when you walk on that set and you have this picture in your head and you see that they gave you that picture in your head, I guess, going into the film, the best thing I can tell you is is, you know, just to enjoy it. But it does have a kind of cautionary Kind of thing to it. But it's just a fun movie, like it was meant to be. A midnight movie for people to get drunk and yell back at the screen and be like don't stick your dick in there, and that's. That's the whole point of the movie. So I did tell people when we opened the the sci-fi fest in San Francisco it's in. Some of you are going to have some very uncomfortable conversations on the way home.

Rob:

Yeah, I think we just got the, the sound bite for the trailer, right there.

Matt:

I think we did. I think that was. That was it too. I wanted to ask also you worked with Chloris Leachman, tara Reeve, danny Trejo, tom Arnold, sean Patrick Flannery, patrick Warburton If you could work with any of them again, or anyone else that you've worked with who would be like your top pick, or a couple of picks that you would absolutely want to work with, oh wow.

Harrison Smith:

I mean I gotta tell you, almost every single person I've worked with has been a delight. I wish I could work with Clarice again. She's gone now, but she was so much fun and we stayed friends right up until she died and she was just the definition of living life. I think I'd like to work with Clarice the most because she really was an inspiring person to work with, like I just you could just sit and listen to her. I mean she told the story of how she banged the living hell out of Gene Hackman in a hotel and you know, and just stuff like that. She taught Marlon Brando's kids piano and you know, she got drunk with Jack Nicholson and like just all these great stories. And you know she knew Paul Lind and I just loved all of that.

Harrison Smith:

So I miss her and I miss what she gave. You know she was always a pleasure but I loved working with, I'll tell you like well, d Wallace is like my second mom now. So I love D and you know. So it's just unfortunate to have worked with a lot of really nice great celebrities, and that I say that the testament is is I stay in touch with a lot of them.

Matt:

That's awesome, you know that's awesome. That's a testament to you as well, I think.

Harrison Smith:

I guess you know like I'm not out to I'm not a prick director. I'm not that. I operate the same way as when I taught, and that is. You know, if you have to tell somebody you're in charge, then you're not. I don't ever have to go on a set and say I'm the director, I.

Rob:

This is what this is my vision.

Harrison Smith:

I don't need to do that, you know. It's just simply, I know what I'm doing. I'm not wasting anybody's time. We're getting the shot, we're going to make our day and that's how it's going to be. And I respect the time of our celebrities and our talent and everybody from the celebrities all the way, you know, through through the crew, it doesn't matter. You're there to get the movie done, that's it, and I think if more people just had that kind of attitude, you just see things run a lot smoother, I think across the board, outside of film as well too, but it doesn't always work that way, but I would say closely.

Matt:

Very awesome. Well, we are very much looking forward to watching the product of your hard work here. That's right In a little bit. You said watch it with somebody you hate. I'm watching it with three of my best friends on the planet. So well, I mean by that is romantically. Oh with your acts, you know that I don't want to do that, but it was a good it was a good tag line.

Harrison Smith:

See, it was someone you hate. You know it's. It's the love story Nobody wanted. That's really what it is. There you go and you'll understand by the end of the movie.

Matt:

Oh, absolutely we're looking forward to it. I will say at the bottom of this cocktail. You do get a surprise, because you're just like inhaling the waterlogged sprite, log Jello and it's just slimy and well, as long as it's not semen, you're in good shape.

Rob:

Well, I don't know, maybe that's the trailer.

Matt:

That those might both make sound bites for sure.

Rob:

Oh my. Well yeah, I think we're going to leave you to your evening. Harrison, Thank you so much for joining us.

Matt:

Thank you so very much.

Rob:

Yeah, Next next year.

Harrison Smith:

I mean that photo of the drink, like when I set up, we'll get a set up for you.

Matt:

We'll do We'll do next, next year, we might have to do another Halloween episode.

Rob:

I could tell you about how I did amateur ghost hunting. I got some weird, weird stories, man.

Harrison Smith:

Oh, I love that kind of stuff.

Rob:

I figured you'd be into it, but, but we'll save that for the next time, yeah we'll have to save that one for another time.

Matt:

So thank you again, very much Thanks.

Rob:

Harrison, you're welcome.

Harrison Smith:

All right, gentlemen.

Matt:

Don't forget to join us next week for our watching reactive Harrison's movie. The special Today's boozy quote comes from magician and comedian Tommy Cooper, who said I'm on a whiskey diet. I've lost three days already. On social media, please like, follow and push all the buttons for us. That's Matt and friends DTU at Facebook, instagram threads and TikTok For more information about the podcast, as well as links to our merch store, social media and all the places you can listen to us. Visit our website mattandfriendsdtucom. That's mattandfriendsdtucom. Thank you again for listening to Matt and Friends Drink the Universe.

Intro and Introductions
Harrison's Upcoming Projects
Why Horror?
Gwen Pearson, Staff Writer for the Liberator
The Special Cocktail
The impact of AI on the Movie Industry
Rob's Movie Career
Cinema Experience and Director's Preferences
Harrison's Preferences
Harrison's Movie "The Special"
Outro, Boozy Quote, Social Media Info

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